The whole family will enjoy walking safaris from Klein’s Camp.

Klein’s Camp | Serengeti National Park Luxury Tanzania Safari Lodge

Discover panoramic views of the Serengeti and Masai Mara from Klein’s Camp, set on an exclusive wilderness concession bordering both national parks. Tucked on the crest of the Kuka Hills, here you can enjoy game drives, night drives and thrilling walking safaris, or uncover the wondrous Maasai culture.

The place

Our ten-seater Cessna gives us incredible aerial views of Ngorongoro Crater, Lake Manyara and the Serengeti Plain before we reach the private airfield, which is covered with grazing zebra and gazelle that flee as we descend. Klein’s Camp looks as much part of the landscape as the Maasai villages that dot the area; 10 circular thatch-roofed huts built on the crest of the Kuka Hills. I can’t help smiling as I see staff members waving and shouting ‘Karibu!’ (Swahili for ‘welcome’) as we exit the aircraft.As we arrive at Klein’s Camp, I’m struck by the wide, open spaces that surround us. We’re on a private 10,000ha conservancy with 360-degree views over the Grumeti Valley. Twice a year, this seemingly endless space is filled with Thomson’s gazelle, wildebeest and zebra migrating between the Masai Mara and the Serengeti.  Seeing a raptor soaring above the cliffs, I feel like we’ve discovered the elemental wildness and unalterable beauty of Africa.

Our ten-seater Cessna gives us incredible aerial views of Ngorongoro Crater, Lake Manyara and the Serengeti Plain before we reach the private airfield, which is covered with grazing zebra and gazelle that flee as we descend. Klein’s Camp looks as much part of the landscape as the Maasai villages that dot the area; 10 circular thatch-roofed huts built on the crest of the Kuka Hills. I can’t help smiling as I see staff members waving and shouting ‘Karibu!’ (Swahili for ‘welcome’) as we exit the aircraft.

As we arrive at Klein’s Camp, I’m struck by the wide, open spaces that surround us. We’re on a private 10,000ha conservancy with 360-degree views over the Grumeti Valley. Twice a year, this seemingly endless space is filled with Thomson’s gazelle, wildebeest and zebra migrating between the Masai Mara and the Serengeti.  Seeing a raptor soaring above the cliffs, I feel like we’ve discovered the elemental wildness and unalterable beauty of Africa.

The room

Our butler, Singoi, shows us to our thatched cottage at Klein’s Camp, perched on the hills with a private verandah overlooking the rolling grasslands. It has whitewashed walls, polished wooden floors with warm rugs thrown across them, and a large, canopied bed with cream linen and furnishings; it wouldn’t look out of place in an decor magazine.We meet Gwandu, our guide, at the central guest area. Steeped in old-world colonial charm, it’s open to the outdoors with a deep, round fire pit at its centre. We seat ourselves on the leather armchairs, set around coffee tables sporting wooden board games, marvelling at the views. The vast expanse of open land is exclusive to Klein’s Camp, and it’s quite possible not to run into other guests while on game drives, making it seem like our personal playground.Driving through the plains, Gwandu reads the bent grasses and dung, taking us towards the Great Wildebeest Migration. Though one can spot lion, leopard and cheetah here year round, as well as herds of buffalo and elephant, it’s sighting the masses of wildebeest, Thomson’s gazelle and zebra trudging along that sets our hearts racing. As we approach, Gwandu points out a group of lion resting in the shade, incuriously watching one of the world’s greatest wildlife shows pass by.

Our butler, Singoi, shows us to our thatched cottage at Klein’s Camp, perched on the hills with a private verandah overlooking the rolling grasslands. It has whitewashed walls, polished wooden floors with warm rugs thrown across them, and a large, canopied bed with cream linen and furnishings; it wouldn’t look out of place in an decor magazine.

We meet Gwandu, our guide, at the central guest area. Steeped in old-world colonial charm, it’s open to the outdoors with a deep, round fire pit at its centre. We seat ourselves on the leather armchairs, set around coffee tables sporting wooden board games, marvelling at the views. The vast expanse of open land is exclusive to Klein’s Camp, and it’s quite possible not to run into other guests while on game drives, making it seem like our personal playground.

Driving through the plains, Gwandu reads the bent grasses and dung, taking us towards the Great Wildebeest Migration. Though one can spot lion, leopard and cheetah here year round, as well as herds of buffalo and elephant, it’s sighting the masses of wildebeest, Thomson’s gazelle and zebra trudging along that sets our hearts racing. As we approach, Gwandu points out a group of lion resting in the shade, incuriously watching one of the world’s greatest wildlife shows pass by.

What sets it apart

It would be hard to choose a favourite thing about Klein’s Camp – the butler that brings us steaming coffee in the mornings, the meals from the camp’s shamba (organic garden), the large plunge pool and the absolute seclusion and freedom.Klein’s Camp has a strong relationship with the Maasai – it leases the land from them and 70% of staff are from the nearby village. The camp also funds local projects, such as a clinic and dispensary, an anti-poaching unit and refurbishments for the local school. It’s a wonderful feeling to be supporting initiatives like these while travelling.

It would be hard to choose a favourite thing about Klein’s Camp – the butler that brings us steaming coffee in the mornings, the meals from the camp’s shamba (organic garden), the large plunge pool and the absolute seclusion and freedom.

Klein’s Camp has a strong relationship with the Maasai – it leases the land from them and 70% of staff are from the nearby village. The camp also funds local projects, such as a clinic and dispensary, an anti-poaching unit and refurbishments for the local school. It’s a wonderful feeling to be supporting initiatives like these while travelling.

At a glance

  • Spacious yet intimate camp on the edge of the Kuku Hills with 10 guest cottages (including one family cottage), swimming pool and safari shop.
  • Private conservancy, private airstrip, private dining, butler, private vehicles available (additional cost) and flexible schedules.
  • Game drives, night drives, walking safaris, cultural visits (additional cost) and spa treatments.
  • Children welcome. Those from 6–12 can participate in game drives at lodge manager’s discretion. Family suite, babysitting and WILDchild programme available.

  • Spacious yet intimate camp on the edge of the Kuku Hills with 10 guest cottages (including one family cottage), swimming pool and safari shop.
  • Private conservancy, private airstrip, private dining, butler, private vehicles available (additional cost) and flexible schedules.
  • Game drives, night drives, walking safaris, cultural visits (additional cost) and spa treatments.
  • Children welcome. Those from 6–12 can participate in game drives at lodge manager’s discretion. Family suite, babysitting and WILDchild programme available.

Prices

  • Not only do African safari lodge prices shift with the seasons, they also change based on your length of stay, room type, travel party composition, special offers, if your trip involves stays at sister lodges – and for more reasons besides.
  • It’s worth noting that depending on your itinerary, your lodge cost will make up about 75–85% of your total safari trip cost.
  • Our safaris are tailor-made to match your personal safari dream, we’d be delighted if you’d allow us to create a bespoke proposal for you.  Simply enquire now – our quotes are complimentary and obligation-free.
  • However, to help you get an idea of safari lodge prices we’ve created three safari-lodge categories with various price ranges, to find out more click here.

  • Not only do African safari lodge prices shift with the seasons, they also change based on your length of stay, room type, travel party composition, special offers, if your trip involves stays at sister lodges – and for more reasons besides.
  • It’s worth noting that depending on your itinerary, your lodge cost will make up about 75–85% of your total safari trip cost.
  • Our safaris are tailor-made to match your personal safari dream, we’d be delighted if you’d allow us to create a bespoke proposal for you.  Simply enquire now – our quotes are complimentary and obligation-free.
  • However, to help you get an idea of safari lodge prices we’ve created three safari-lodge categories with various price ranges, to find out more click here.

When to Go

This is a wonderful time to visit northern Tanzania, with the vegetation initially lush after the rains, but then dying back, making the wildlife that much easier to see. Temperatures are cooler (although the days are warm and sunny). With the wildebeest herds assembling to make the perilous crossing of the Grumeti River, this is the busiest time of the year here. Tarangire is a great option now, with locally migrating wildlife concentrating along the Tarangire River, or take in the tree-climbing lion and beautiful seasonal waterfalls at Lake Manyara.

The long dry spell between the rains sees the vegetation cycle being repeated: lovely green grass immediately after the rains subsequently starts to wither. As food and water become scarcer, game concentrates around waterholes, making wildlife viewing particularly easy in January. Wildebeest calving in January and February on the southern Serengeti short-grass plains means a glut of kills – it’s the best time for predator action. Away from the Serengeti, this is an ideal opportunity to see resident game in the Ngorongoro Crater and at Lake Manyara, and birders will enjoy spotting migratory species.

These are perhaps not the ideal times to visit northern Tanzania as they represent the two peaks of the wet season – the long rains in April and May; the short rains in November. This does mean however that you’ll be sharing the game reserves and national parks of northern Tanzania with far fewer people, and there’s still plenty to see. During the long rains, the Great Wildebeest Migration moves north in the Serengeti, through Seronera towards the Western Corridor, while in November the herds return from the Masai Mara.

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