Botswana is famous for its elephant numbers. © Desert & Delta Safaris

Botswana | Lagoon & Waterways | 6 Nights Moremi Game Reserve & Okavango Delta

The Okavango Delta – and Moremi Game Reserve, which protects much of this UNESCO World Heritage Site – offers not only incredible wildlife experiences, but the opportunity to understand a unique and fragile ecosystem. Carefully sited and sensitively run, Camp Moremi and Camp Okavango allow visitors to explore at their own pace.

  • A remote island location ideal as a launchpad for discovering a watery wilderness (Camp Okavango) and a lagoon-side setting permitting both land and water activities (Camp Moremi).
  • Game drives through a wildlife-rich patchwork quilt of habitats at Camp Moremi, and the chance to just drift around in a mokoro at Camp Okavango.
  • As an exclusive tented safari camp in a treeline, Camp Moremi perfectly complements the raised decks and safari suites of Camp Okavango. For more information, see Camp Moremi and Camp Okavango respectively.

Three nights at Camp Moremi

The light aircraft flight from Maun gave us a fish eagle’s view of the Okavango Delta, and from the moment we landed at the bush airstrip, we knew we were somewhere special. Our short drive to Camp Moremi was interrupted by the antics of a troop of baboon – there were so many of them, and they were so curious about the piles of elephant poop, that it took them a while to pass in front of us. On arrival, we mirrored their curiosity as we examined our delightful tent with its Moremi Game Reserve views before our short sundowner game drive. Waking early was a pleasure the next morning, knowing that we would be having fresh fireside coffee as the sun rose, and then setting off on a walking safari. The pace was leisurely, as there were so many details that our guide was keen to point out to us. As an architect, my partner was enthralled by the termite mounds and the fact that insects can design an air-conditioning system. After an equally leisurely lunch, we took a siesta before an afternoon game drive that ended where a hunt had also terminated; there in the sausage tree above us was a female leopard with her kill. Our third day at Camp Moremi perfectly illustrated how varied the Okavango Delta is. We enjoyed traditional Botswana transport with a mokoro excursion along secluded, papyrus-fringed channels. I was delighted when a jewel-like painted reed-frog became a stowaway by hopping on board. After letting us take a closer look, our poler gently scooped him up and set him on a water lily. In that one gesture was so much of what made our safari wonderful. Later, we couldn’t resist a return visit to ‘our’ leopard, after which we had the obligatory G&T in the camp’s sunken bar – by another termite mound!

The light aircraft flight from Maun gave us a fish eagle’s view of the Okavango Delta, and from the moment we landed at the bush airstrip, we knew we were somewhere special. Our short drive to Camp Moremi was interrupted by the antics of a troop of baboon – there were so many of them, and they were so curious about the piles of elephant poop, that it took them a while to pass in front of us. On arrival, we mirrored their curiosity as we examined our delightful tent with its Moremi Game Reserve views before our short sundowner game drive.

Waking early was a pleasure the next morning, knowing that we would be having fresh fireside coffee as the sun rose, and then setting off on a walking safari. The pace was leisurely, as there were so many details that our guide was keen to point out to us. As an architect, my partner was enthralled by the termite mounds and the fact that insects can design an air-conditioning system. After an equally leisurely lunch, we took a siesta before an afternoon game drive that ended where a hunt had also terminated; there in the sausage tree above us was a female leopard with her kill.

Our third day at Camp Moremi perfectly illustrated how varied the Okavango Delta is. We enjoyed traditional Botswana transport with a mokoro excursion along secluded, papyrus-fringed channels. I was delighted when a jewel-like painted reed-frog became a stowaway by hopping on board. After letting us take a closer look, our poler gently scooped him up and set him on a water lily. In that one gesture was so much of what made our safari wonderful. Later, we couldn’t resist a return visit to ‘our’ leopard, after which we had the obligatory G&T in the camp’s sunken bar – by another termite mound!

Three nights at Camp Okavango

Over a very indulgent late breakfast we worked on our birding skills before heading back to the airstrip for the shortest – but most beautiful – flight of our lives: 10 airborne minutes we would have gladly extended. Although not far from our previous camp, Camp Okavango was quite different in feel. The first thing we noticed was that there were no vehicles: the emphasis was very much on human-powered exploration. A short walk brought us to our next luxury Botswana safari accommodation, and we didn’t stop walking until we’d reached the edge of our private verandah. That, however, was as far as we got for the rest of the day: although the transfer was hardly arduous, the view over the swampy grasslands was compelling enough to accompany us through afternoon tea, sundowners and a private dinner on our own deck. To test our ‘sea legs’, we spend the next morning on a boat excursion. The addition of a quiet engine let us travel that much further, and into deeper channels and lagoons. Our boat captain had an uncanny eye for even the faintest hint of a hippo ear or nostril, and guided us between pods of them in a slow-motion, almost balletic slalom. The island picnic lunch was both surprising and delicious; happily our fellow guests had not been counting on us to provide for them, as our attempts at fishing proved fruitless (although as it was strictly catch-and-release, our quarry would have been safe either way). The next day found us back on the water, as we were unable to resist the siren call of the frogs. The second mokoro trip of our Botswana safari was a different experience, but no less special. Our poler and guide taught us a great deal about traditional Okavango lifestyles, and how local people sustainably used the area’s resources for centuries. We returned to Camp Okavango sporting water-lily-leaf hats, and having snacked on roots and tubers that were all new to us. They certainly gave us the energy we needed for our afternoon walk, and to take more pictures for Instagram.

Over a very indulgent late breakfast we worked on our birding skills before heading back to the airstrip for the shortest – but most beautiful – flight of our lives: 10 airborne minutes we would have gladly extended.

Although not far from our previous camp, Camp Okavango was quite different in feel. The first thing we noticed was that there were no vehicles: the emphasis was very much on human-powered exploration. A short walk brought us to our next luxury Botswana safari accommodation, and we didn’t stop walking until we’d reached the edge of our private verandah. That, however, was as far as we got for the rest of the day: although the transfer was hardly arduous, the view over the swampy grasslands was compelling enough to accompany us through afternoon tea, sundowners and a private dinner on our own deck.

To test our ‘sea legs’, we spend the next morning on a boat excursion. The addition of a quiet engine let us travel that much further, and into deeper channels and lagoons. Our boat captain had an uncanny eye for even the faintest hint of a hippo ear or nostril, and guided us between pods of them in a slow-motion, almost balletic slalom. The island picnic lunch was both surprising and delicious; happily our fellow guests had not been counting on us to provide for them, as our attempts at fishing proved fruitless (although as it was strictly catch-and-release, our quarry would have been safe either way).

The next day found us back on the water, as we were unable to resist the siren call of the frogs. The second mokoro trip of our Botswana safari was a different experience, but no less special. Our poler and guide taught us a great deal about traditional Okavango lifestyles, and how local people sustainably used the area’s resources for centuries. We returned to Camp Okavango sporting water-lily-leaf hats, and having snacked on roots and tubers that were all new to us. They certainly gave us the energy we needed for our afternoon walk, and to take more pictures for Instagram.

What sets it apart

Our luxury Botswana safari was a study in contrasts – between wet and dry habitats, different modes of transport, and different views. And yet there was a theme that ran through it, connecting our diverse experiences and setting our time in the Okavango Delta and Moremi Game Reserve apart. From the eco-friendly architecture to the evident love the local guides had for the wild places they showed us, there was a real sense of care for this unique and precious ecosystem. It was this appreciation of how rare and important the Okavango Delta is that most impressed us – on each activity we took part in, whether we were being driven, propelled along in a mokoro, or stretching our legs on a guided bush walk, it was clear that equal weight was given to the quality of our experience, and minimising the impact that it had. Of course, it wasn’t hard to see how the people of Botswana would instinctively love and care for the delta; what was remarkable was the way they gently conveyed this sense of responsibility to us in a way that deepened rather than compromised our enjoyment. We knew that we would leave as staunch advocates for conserving Botswana’s wilderness areas, and that keen as we would be to spread this message, we’d depart reluctantly, with many a backward glance at each of our luxury Botswana safari camps, and with an appreciation for the forward-looking way in which they were being operated.

Our luxury Botswana safari was a study in contrasts – between wet and dry habitats, different modes of transport, and different views. And yet there was a theme that ran through it, connecting our diverse experiences and setting our time in the Okavango Delta and Moremi Game Reserve apart.

From the eco-friendly architecture to the evident love the local guides had for the wild places they showed us, there was a real sense of care for this unique and precious ecosystem. It was this appreciation of how rare and important the Okavango Delta is that most impressed us – on each activity we took part in, whether we were being driven, propelled along in a mokoro, or stretching our legs on a guided bush walk, it was clear that equal weight was given to the quality of our experience, and minimising the impact that it had.

Of course, it wasn’t hard to see how the people of Botswana would instinctively love and care for the delta; what was remarkable was the way they gently conveyed this sense of responsibility to us in a way that deepened rather than compromised our enjoyment.

We knew that we would leave as staunch advocates for conserving Botswana’s wilderness areas, and that keen as we would be to spread this message, we’d depart reluctantly, with many a backward glance at each of our luxury Botswana safari camps, and with an appreciation for the forward-looking way in which they were being operated.

DAY 1–3

At Camp Moremi you'll be surrounded by vivid, emerald shades. © Desert & Delta Safaris

You’ll be met as you disembark from your international flight at Maun Airport in Maun, and assisted through customs and immigration. After a scheduled light-aircraft flight to Moremi Game Reserve, you’ll take a transfer to Camp Moremi, where you’ll spend three nights.

DAY 4–6

Dine al fresco at Camp Okavango. © Desert & Delta Safaris

After a transfer from Camp Moremi to the airstrip, you’ll take a light-aircraft flight to the Okavango Delta. A short walk will take you to Camp Okavango, where you’ll spend three nights.

DAY 7

Take a guided island bush walk from Camp Okavango. © Desert & Delta Safaris

After a short walk from Camp Okavango to the airstrip, you’ll take a light-aircraft flight to Maun, to connect with your international flight.

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  • This luxury safari trip idea is simply to show you what’s possible. To see what this type of safari costs, and what’s generally included, click hereFor a general overview of African safari prices, you can click through to our blog.
  • We also offer a curated selection of Botswana safari packages, wrapped and priced for your convenience, click here to explore them.

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